Top 10 Endangered Languages in the World

Have you ever though how the world would have been if there would have been no languages to communicate? It is true that language has played the most significant part in the progress of communication and technology. Though English, German, France etc are widely spoken there are also few languages which are native to certain places and due to the influence of some of the European dialect these mother tongues are fading out. Much effort was not taken to save these languages which resulted in the downward movement in the number of speaker. So let has have a glimpse of the names that has been included in the record of top 10 most endangered languages in the world.

List of 10 Endangered Languages

1. Apiaca

2. Bikya

3. Taje

4. Dampelas

5. Diahoi

6. Kaixana

7. Laua

8. Yamana

9. Kulon – Pazeh

10. Pemono

Top Ten Endangered Languages in the World

Are you well aware of the languages whose end are near approaching and will very soon be eradicated from the list of spoken languages? Get along the write up to know more about the top ten most endangered languages in the world.

1. Apiaca

Apiaca is the language spoken by a type of Brazilian native and it is one of the most endangered languages in the world. Due to gradual acceptance of Portuguese into the Mato Grosso region of Brazil this particular language’s usage is decreasing day by day. In spite of ethnic population hovering around 192 people, the language only appeared to have one remaining speaker in 2007.

2. Bikya

Spoken in Cameroon, Bikya is a Bantoid language also known as Furu. In 1986 four surviving speakers were identified, although only one spoke the language fluently. In 2007 Kiessling reported that Bikya has the largest number of remaining speakers of the Furu languages though the number is descending with the passage of time.

3. Taje

Taje is an Austronesia language, also known as Petapa is spoken in Sulawesi. It was apparently only spoken by one person in 2000 and is entirely believable that it may have passed into extinction since then, but no linguist or ethnographer knows for certain. The current number of Taje people are 350 and practises Islam as their faith.

4. Dampelas

Dampelas is yet another Austronesia language spoken in Sulawesi. UNESCO claims that only one of the 10,300 Dampelas peoples spoke this particular language as of 2000, meaning it may very soon be wiped out. Also referred to as Dampal, Dian and Dampelasa this language was spoken in a total of eight villages of Indonesia, once upon a time.

5. Diahoi

Hailing from the Amazon region of Brazil, Diahoi is also known as Jiahui, Jahoi, Djahui, Diahkoi and Diarroi. Due to the isolated location, linguists and ethnographers don’t know for certain whether or not the language has become officially extinct though there was only one Diahoi speaker in the world in 2006.

6. Kaixana

Kaixana is one of the many critically scarce languages which occupies the sixth position in the list of Top 10 most endangered languages in the world. In 2008   the last known individual to boast Kaixana as his chief language was 78 years old Raimundo Avelino who lived in Limoeiro, Amazonas, Brazil. The language was once spoken in a village near the banks of the Japura River, located in Brazil. Over time, Portuguese settlers took over the area resulting in the decrease in number.

7. Laua

Laua or Labu is a language spoken in the Central Province, north and west of Laua, Papua New Guinea. Laua had only one remaining speaker in 1987 and the last speaker was registered in 2000. The last speaker used to converse and lead his life completely in the native style but currently nothing can be concluded about him.

8. Yamana

Yaghan is the alternative name of Yamana which is a native language of Chile. Yamana was one among the first South American languages to be recorded by European explorers and missionaries but now it is tragic to see its number of speakers going down. Cristina Calderon is the last speaker of the dialect which is threaten by the influence of Spanish.

9. Kulon – Pazeh

Kulon – Pazeh is the ninth language in the list of top ten most endangered languages in the world. The dialect is more in danger after the end of Pan Jin-yu in 2010 who took immense trouble to educate people in the inhabitant areas to speak the native tongue. Despite it, it is used as a second language. Probabilities are it will very soon be lost.

10. Pemono

The list of top 10 most endangered languages in the world won’t be completed without mentioning the Venezuelan language, Pemono. If reports are to be believed there is only one last speaker of the tongue who lives in Upper Majagua village. The specific lingo is closely related to the better-known language Panare.

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